List Of 101 High Protein Foods

Protein is a vital nutrient for the body. It promotes the growth and repair of muscles, organs, bones, and tissues. A high protein diet can help with weight loss because it has a higher metabolic rate than carbs or fats.

Why Do We Need High-Protein Foods?

The body cannot make protein on its own. We need to get it from our diets or supplements. It is common for people who are trying to lose weight to cut back on the number of calories they eat and replace some with high-protein foods.

High-protein foods are essential for weight loss because they keep you full longer than other foods. We all know that feeling of being hungry after eating a meal, and high protein foods help to prevent this by keeping us satisfied for hours on end.

Protein is also very important in maintaining muscle mass while losing weight, which helps your body burn more calories throughout the day. High-protein diets are superior when it comes to burning fat compared to lower-protein diets.

If you want to lose weight faster without sacrificing the taste or quality of food, then try adding some high protein options into your diet!

high protein foods on a wooden board
Most diets are low in protein and unsustainable, which is why so many people end up gaining all of their lost weight back. A better solution is to start eating high protein foods. Add these delicious high-protein foods that will help you lose weight without feeling hungry or unsatisfied!

5 Reasons High Protein Diets Are Beneficial

  1. Healthy skin, hair, and nails – especially when combined with collagen food sources (connective tissue).
  2. Fullness factor; helps you feel satisfied after meals. This leads to reduced snacking and hence, weight loss. Calorie for calorie, high protein foods give a great sense of satiety or fullness.
  3. Maintaining or increasing lean muscle mass – especially when combined with exercise. A high protein diet can increase metabolism and help to prevent muscle loss as we age.
  4. Keep blood sugar stable, since protein is digested at a steady pace without causing a spike in blood sugar.
  5. Increase muscle mass and decrease fat, which helps with weight loss by increasing basal metabolic rate.

How Much Protein Should I Eat Daily?

To figure out how much protein you need daily, determine your lean body mass (LBM) with this equation:

Weight (in pounds) * (0.35 + (6.25 x your height in inches)) / 2.2 = Your LBM

So if you are 150 lbs and 5’3″ tall, your LBM = 150 * (0.35 + (6.25 x 69 inches))/ 2.2) = 105 lbs

Once you have figured out your LBM, multiply that number by a factor of .8 or .9 to give yourself a daily protein intake requirement:

105lbs * .8 = 84g of protein needed.

What Are The Best High-Protein Foods?

Animal proteins are the best quality because they are complete proteins (contain all 10 essential amino acids) and can be easily absorbed by the body. Muscle meats, eggs, and dairy products are typically the highest in protein.

How many calories is in an egg?

Fish, poultry, tofu/soybeans/tempeh/legumes, and even nuts can be high-protein foods depending on how they’re prepared.

Examples Of High-Protein Foods You Can Eat To Lose Weight

Our list is in no particular order and we recommend that you always consult with your doctor to get the go-ahead before starting a new diet.

30 Animal Sources Of Protein

  1. A large egg contains 6.3 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  2. Egg whites contain 4.7 grams of protein per cup
  3. Lean steak has 22 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  4. Turkey contains 28.6 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  5. Yogurt and kefir contain 12–16 grams of protein per 170-200 gram serving
  6. Lean ground beef contains 23–25 grams per 100-gram serving
  7. Chicken breast contains 31.7 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  8. Skim milk has 8.6 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  9.   Whole milk has 9.2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  10.   Greek yogurt has 20–23 grams of protein per 170-200 gram serving
  11.   Beef sirloin steak has 40 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  12.   Cottage cheese has 31 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  13.   Tilapia has 21.4 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  14.   Tuna has 24 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  15.   Cod contains 17.3 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  16.   Haddock has 22.8 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  17.   Whole milk contains 8 grams of protein per cup
  18.   Canned salmon has 23–25 grams of protein in a 3-ounce serving
  19.   Trout has 22.4 grams of protein in a 3-ounce serving
  20.   Casein protein powder has 25–30 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  21.   Soy protein powder contains 18.2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  22.   Salmon contains 23 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  23.   Oysters contain 13.5 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  24.   Mussels contain 15.7 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  25.   Whey protein powder contains 25 grams of protein per scoop
  26.   Lamb chops contain 22 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  27.   Lean, ground turkey contains 20.1 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  28.   Skinless chicken breast has 30 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  29.   Halibut contains 19.7 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  30.   Shrimp contains 18.2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving

70 Non-Animal Sources Of Protein

  1. 100% whole wheat bread contains 7.1 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  2. Potatoes contain 4.2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  3. Pumpkin contains 6.1 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  4. Romaine lettuce has 2.3 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  5. Spinach has 3.2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  6. Broccoli has 4 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  7. Cauliflower contains 2.1 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  8. Celery contains 1.3 grams of protein per cup 100-gram serving
  9. Soy milk contains 8.2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  10.   Chia seeds have 12 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  11.   Tofu has 10 grams of protein per 4 ounces (1/2 block)
  12.   Tempeh has 19 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  13.   Lentils have 18 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  14.   Pine nuts contain 11 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  15.   Flax seeds contain 10 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  16.   Hummus has 8 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  17.   Chickpeas have 7 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  18.   Almond butter has 7 grams of protein per 2 tablespoons
  19.   Almonds have about 16 grams of protein per ounce
  20.   Quinoa contains 8 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  21.   Navy beans contain 16 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  22.   Sesame seeds have about 6 grams of protein per ounce
  23.   Brazil nuts contain 4 grams of protein per ounce
  24.   Watermelon contains 1 gram of protein for every 15 grams of carbohydrate
  25.   Oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  26.   Ezekiel bread contains 10 grams of protein per 2 slices
  27.   Walnuts contain 6 grams of protein per ounce
  28.   Pumpkin seeds contain 8 grams of protein per ounce
  29.   Peanuts contain 7 grams of protein per ounce
  30.   Hemp seeds contain 10 grams of protein per 3 tablespoons
  31.   Pistachios contain 6 grams of protein per ounce
  32.   Edamame contains 8 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  33.   Asparagus contains 3.6 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  34.   Mung beans contain 16.5 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  35.   Cashews contain about 4.5 grams of protein per ounce
  36.   Sunflower seeds contain about 6 grams of protein per ounce
  37.   Watercress contains 1 gram of protein per 100-gram serving
  38.   Kale contains 2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  39.   Cherries contain 1 gram of protein per cup when cooked
  40.   Mint contains 1 gram of protein for every 30 grams of carbohydrates
  41.   Gooseberries contain 1.4 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  42.   Currants contain 1 gram of protein per 100-gram serving
  43.   Pomegranate seeds contain about 4 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  44.   Blueberries contain 2 grams of protein for every 10 grams of carbohydrate
  45.   Raspberries contain 2.1 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  46.   Avocados contain 2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  47.   Cranberries contain 3 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  48.   Strawberries contain 1.7 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  49.   Grapefruit contains 1.2 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  50.   Lime contains 0.5 grams of protein per 100-gram serving
  51.   Blackberries contain about 3 grams of protein for every 10 grams of carbohydrate
  52.   Oranges have 1 gram of protein for every 15 grams of carbohydrate
  53.   Honeydew melon has 0.7 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  54.   Pears contain 0.7 grams of protein for every 15 grams of carbohydrate
  55.   Carrots contain 1.3 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  56.   Apples contain about 0.5 grams of protein for every 15 grams of carbohydrate
  57.   Garlic contains 0.9 grams of protein for every 10 grams of carbohydrate
  58.   Scallions contain 1 gram of protein per bunch or 2 cups when cooked
  59.   Leeks contain about 1 gram of protein for every 10 grams of carbohydrate
  60.   Cabbage contains 1.5 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  61.   Kohlrabi contains 1 gram of protein per 100-gram serving
  62.   Beets contain about 2 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  63.   Mushrooms contain 4.3 grams of protein per 100-gram serving (about 3/4 ounce)
  64.   Radishes contain about 1 gram of protein per 100-gram serving
  65.   Turnips contain 1.4 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  66.   Tomatoes contain 0.9 grams of protein for every 10 grams of carbohydrate
  67.   Eggplants contain 1 gram of protein for every 10 grams of carbohydrate
  68.   Asparagus contains 3.6 grams of protein per cup when cooked
  69.   Corn contains 1.5 grams of protein for every 15 grams of carbohydrate
  70.   Chicory greens contain about 2.5 grams of protein for every 10 grams of carbohydrate

Why Does Protein Reduce Appetite and Hunger Levels?

one pounds of raw steak - protein reduces hunger levels
Feel hungry all the time? If so, it’s probably because you aren’t eating enough protein. Protein is what makes us feel full for longer periods of time. It takes much longer to digest and absorb than other macronutrients like carbohydrates or fat.

Protein makes you feel satiated because it takes longer for your intestines to digest and absorb protein. As a result, when you eat a high-protein meal, blood amino acid levels stay elevated in the body much longer than they would following a low-protein meal.

The result is that you don’t get hungry as quickly or as often.

In addition, research suggests that protein stimulates the release of satiety hormones in the body.

Reducing Levels Of Ghrelin

A study published in Nutrition & Metabolism showed that increasing dietary protein from 15 percent to 30 percent of total daily calories resulted in a 55-percent reduction in ad libitum caloric intake, while also significantly reducing levels of ghrelin – the hormone responsible for stimulating hunger.

Another study published in the journal Appetite found that diets containing 34 percent of total calories from protein, as opposed to 15 percent, reduced food intake significantly during lunch and dinner (13-19 percent reductions).

A third study, published in Nutrition Research, showed once again that increasing dietary protein consumption to 30 percent of daily calories reduced appetite and led to a reduction in food intake.

Protein Increases Your Metabolism

In addition, research suggests that protein may increase your metabolism by up to 80-100 calories per day. One study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that when men and women increased their daily intake of low-fat dairy products their resting energy expenditure (the number of calories you burn at rest) increased by almost 100 calories per day.

A second study published in the journal Obesity found that increasing dietary protein from 15 percent to 30 percent of total daily calories reduced appetite and food intake, resulting in significant weight loss.

The researchers suggest that increased dietary protein may be an effective strategy for achieving weight loss goals due to improved satiety and a reduction in fat-promoting hormone ghrelin.

Calorie Intake And Weight Loss

When you start a calorie-restricted diet, your goal should be to lose no more than one or two pounds per week. To accomplish that goal, aim for a daily reduction of 500 calories per day through reduced carbohydrate consumption.

If you want to cut fat from your diet, replace the calorie-dense fat sources (i.e. fatty meats) with foods that are lower in calories and higher in protein, such as chicken breast or fish.

Keep in mind that it’s not just about reducing calories; rather, you want to choose low glycemic carbohydrate sources (vegetables, legumes, beans), increase your intake of protein-rich food and healthy fats, and reduce your consumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates.

If you focus on these types of dietary changes, you should be able to lose weight quickly and efficiently while not feeling hungry or tired all the time.

If I Eat A Balanced Diet, Do I Need Protein Shakes?

strawberry protein shake
You should always look at the ingredients list first when choosing which type of protein shake or powder is best for you. If possible, try not to buy any products that contain artificial sweeteners like sucralose because they can cause digestive issues such as bloating, cramping, gas etc.,

The answer is no. Protein shakes are not designed to take the place of eating whole foods or to be the only source of protein you consume.

However, protein shakes and powders can be a great addition to anyone’s daily intake, especially for people who don’t get enough protein through food consumption or for individuals whose diets lack in quantity and/or quality.

Those who are very physically active and those who are trying to lose weight will benefit from a protein shake as well.

The key is to strategically include them into your nutrition plan, not have them replace daily meals.

How Do Vegans Get Protein?

Vegans don’t eat any animal products, so they have to be more careful about getting all essential amino acids that are found in meat. Some good vegan protein sources are beans, legumes, nuts, seeds, and soy products.

Getting enough protein isn’t difficult for vegans, but it does require some planning ahead.

If you are vegan you should be aware of which foods are protein-rich so that you can include them in your diet, especially on days when you are very active.

You have to pay attention not only to how much protein you get but also to the quality of the protein. With a balanced vegan diet, there’s no need for supplementation.

What Are Some Low-Carb, High-Protein Snacks?

Some Good Low-Carb Snacks That Are Rich In Protein Include:

Hard-boiled eggs

hard boiled egg and halved hardboiled egg
One egg contains about six grams of protein, which makes them a quick and easy snack option

Greek yogurt

mixed fresh Greek yogurt on a table
Greek Yogurt is rich in high-quality protein and also provides calcium, vitamin D and probiotics

String cheese

several pieces of string cheese and one shredded cheese
String cheese is packed with 12 grams of protein per piece and as such it’s a great on-the-go snack

Peanut butter

peanuts and jar of peanut butter on a table
Peanut butter comes second after almonds in terms of protein content and is an excellent source of healthy fat and magnesium

Nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachios)

handful of pistachios
Nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachios) provide a good dose of essential fatty acids and contain approximately six grams of protein per ounce

How Much Protein Should I Eat To Gain Muscle?

Athletes and anyone managing a calorie-restricted diet need to pay close attention to their protein consumption.

For those who are trying to build muscle mass while weight training, it’s important to consume at least one gram of protein per pound of body weight.

For those trying to maximize fat loss and muscle retention, the minimum is approximately 0.45 grams of protein per pound of body weight.

Keep in mind that muscles need amino acids for energy and growth, so it’s important to consume a constant supply of high-quality proteins throughout the day.

What Is Whey Protein?

Whey protein is derived from cow’s milk and it’s often viewed as the gold standard of naturally occurring proteins.

As such, whey is one of the most studied supplements in sports nutrition. Research suggests that taking whey protein before and/or after resistance exercise enhances muscle strength, size, and body composition (higher lean mass to fat mass ratio).

Whey protein is also very high in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which are important for the maintenance of muscle tissue.

For these reasons, whey protein has become one of the most popular supplements among athletes and anyone looking to build muscle mass while losing fat at the same time.

What Are The Benefits Of Taking Whey Protein?

Whey protein has been scientifically proven to facilitate weight loss and muscle gain.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that overweight individuals who consumed whey protein for eight weeks lost more belly fat and body weight than those who did not.  They also experienced significant increases in some hormones, such as insulin-like growth factor 1 and -2 (IGF-1 and IGF-2).

Whey protein has also been shown to improve glucose regulation and enhance the effects of exercise on muscle strength and size.

A study published in the Journal of Nutrition revealed that supplementing with whey protein improved muscle strength and size to a greater extent than soy in athletes training during an eight-week resistance program.

Whey Proteins Can Reduce Appetite

Whey proteins can also reduce appetite by providing lasting satiety signals to the brain. One study showed that having 25 grams of whey protein before breakfast, lunch and dinner reduced calorie intake by approximately 430 calories.

In addition, whey is a complete protein that contains all nine essential amino acids in the right ratios. In contrast, plant proteins don’t provide a full spectrum of amino acids and must be combined with other sources to form complete proteins.

The amino acid leucine is the primary driver of muscle protein synthesis and whey proteins have a higher concentration of this amino acid than any other source.

Whey also provides a good dose of glutamine, which may help enhance immune function by sustaining T-cell production. There’s also some evidence that supplementation with glutamine promotes a positive nitrogen balance, which is essential for muscle growth.

What Are The Different Types Of Whey Protein?

Whey protein can be divided into three major categories: whey protein concentrate (WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI) and hydrolyzed whey.

Whey proteins are often mixed with other ingredients, such as maltodextrin, sunflower oil or cocoa powder to improve their solubility or taste.

1) Whey Protein Concentrate (WPC)

Whey protein concentrate is the cheapest form of whey, but also contains lower concentrations of bioactive compounds than whey proteins. WPC can contain between 34–80% pure protein with the remainder being fats, lactose, and impurities.

This type of whey is produced using mild processing methods that retain most of the proteins, which include BCAAs, minerals and microfractions such as lactoferrin and immunoglobins.

Despite having lower purity levels than WPI, whey protein concentrate has a higher content of lactose and fats.

WPC is often the best option for people on a budget.

2) Whey Protein Isolate (WPI)

Whey protein isolate is produced using micro- and ultra-filtration, which means it’s one of the purest forms of whey protein that exist. WPI can contain up to 90% pure protein, which means it’s also an expensive type of whey.

This type of whey is made without using any chemicals or heat, which preserves all of the proteins and bioactive compounds found in raw whey.

Despite its high price point, WPI can be cost-prohibitive due to lower yields. It’s more difficult to obtain whey protein isolate using traditional methods, so the process requires more time and money.

WPI is whey protein in its purest form because it contains lower concentrations of lactose, fats, and impurities than WPC. Some people may be sensitive to lactose or fats, so WPI may be the better option.

3) Hydrolyzed Whey

Hydrolyzed whey undergoes hydrolysis or pre-digestion with enzymes to break down proteins into smaller subunits that are easier to absorb during digestion.

As a result, hydrolyzed whey is the most expensive form of whey on the market.

Hydrolyzed whey is often the best option for people with lactose intolerance or milk allergies. Although hydrolyzed whey protein comes from dairy, it doesn’t contain lactose.

The benefit of hydrolyzed whey for folks looking to build muscle is that the process of hydrolysis breaks down proteins into smaller subunits that are easier to absorb by enzymes in the digestive tract.

This means the amino acids head right to where they’re needed- to the muscles for protein synthesis.

Some studies have shown that this form of whey may also help control blood sugar levels.

Collagen Protein

Collagen protein is beneficial for bone and joint health, skin elasticity, cartilage, heart health, gut lining integrity, and wound healing.

It also has anti-inflammatory properties because it contains the amino acids glycine and proline that are supposed to help repair wounds so they can heal faster.

The secret sauce of collagen protein is its high content of hydroxyproline, a rare amino acid that’s found in high concentrations in bovine bones and skin.

This type of collagen is safe for people who are sensitive to whey because the proteins are broken down into smaller amino acids that don’t cause allergic reactions.

Collagen protein is different from whey in that the amino acids are in peptide form instead of a free-form.

This means collagen protein is digested and absorbed into the bloodstream more slowly, which may help increase feelings of fullness for longer periods.

Casein Protein

Casein protein is the main protein found in cow’s milk, making it another dairy-based protein source.

Unlike whey which contains high concentrations of BCAAs and other micro fractions, casein has a much higher concentration of calcium and phosphorus.

This type of protein also contains bioactive compounds that may help reduce blood pressure and cholesterol, according to studies.

Casein protein is often the best option for people who can’t tolerate whey because it’s a very slow-digesting protein. If your goal is to use protein as an anti-catabolic or muscle-building tool, using casein at night can help you build muscle while going into a fasted state.

This is because casein protein digests very slowly, so it provides a steady release of amino acids for up to seven hours.

Casein protein can also help you relax and fall asleep faster because it contains the amino acid tryptophan, which helps produce serotonin-a neurotransmitter that regulates appetite and sleep.

There’s also some evidence that this type of protein can help control blood sugar levels and promote gut health by providing a steady release of amino acids into the bloodstream, which reduces spikes in blood sugar levels.

However, casein is not lactose-free. Casein contains similar peptides to whey, which means it can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

There are no standard dosage recommendations for casein protein due to a lack of research on this specific form of protein. If taken, however, 30 grams per day is a typical dose that should be safe and effective.

We hope you enjoyed this article covering the top protein-rich foods for women that can help with weight loss and muscle gain. This resource should be shared with all your friends so they too can enjoy these benefits. Have you tried any of these? What are some other ways to incorporate more protein into your diet? Let us know!